Wood-Mizer Project Gallery

Bob Jones - Farmhouse Remodel

Over the course of nine months, Bob Jones remodeled an 1800's era farmhouse for his wife who submitted their project. "The house needed to be completely remodeled and my husband wanted to use his sawmill to enhance the house without using any sheet rock,” said Mrs. Jones. “When we ripped out all of the old plaster and lath, we found the original chestnut beams. They really enhanced the new woodwork." Bob saved thousands of dollars by sawing 100% of the lumber for the 1,800 square foot remodel with his Wood-Mizer LT40 portable sawmill. Bob’s wife said "the accuracy of the cuts" on Bob's LT40 really helped the house look great. "The house was in total disrepair and it was an incredible feeling to bring it back to life."

 

bunk beds inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
bedroom inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
bathroom inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
bedroom inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
 
kitchen and fireplace inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
interior of remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
living room inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse
office inside remodeled 1800's era farmhouse

Nicholas Spooner - New England Barn
framing of 32' x 40' x 38' high, three-story barn
framing of 32' x 40' x 38' high, three-story barn
ceiling inside of 32' x 40' x 38' high, three-story barn
raising the frame for framing of 32' x 40' x 38' high, three-story barn
 
trailer with lumber
lifting framing ends
Nicholas Spooner
framing of 32' x 40' x 38' high, three-story barn

In 2006, James “Bucky” Spooner and his wife, Georgiana, purchased a Wood-Mizer LT40 Hydraulic portable sawmill for their son, Nicholas, to operate and provide lumber for family building projects. Nicholas, while attending college and trying to find his place in life, soon started to take a serious interest in building. He was particularly interested in the classical styling of the timber frame structures found in the family’s hometown of Topsham, Vermont and throughout the entire New England area. Armed with the desire to build and a Wood-Mizer mill, all Nicholas needed now was a chance. This chance came shortly after his brother Chris, and wife Aimee bought a new home in Piermont, New Hampshire. Immediately after they bought the property, Chris began talking about the need for a barn on their new homestead. After much discussion and several practice projects between the two brothers, Chris made the decision to hire Nicholas to build the barn. In the fall of 2009, they began clearing five acres of land to make way for the 32' x 40' x 38' high, three-story structure. With the help of Spooner Construction, the land was cleared and the foundation poured for the barn basement. With a mountain of hemlock their uncle, Bruce Cameron, had cut from a neighboring town, they were ready to begin their “building extravaganza.”

 

Ultimately, five different types of wood was used in the project, and approximately 33,000 board feet of wood was cut using the mill. The estimated savings was $18,000 and 99% of the wood needed for the barn was cut on his Wood-Mizer sawmill. “Chris wanted to incorporate lumber from all three of the properties he owned to build this project. The white pine siding and ash pegs were harvested from his property in Piermont, where the barn was to be erected. The one long, red pine post our late grandfather (George Hodge) planted completed the requirement for property number two," said Nicholas. "The only piece of property remaining was one owned by Chris and myself that we purchased off our Grandmother June Spooner’s estate, where the milling and notching of the timber frame was taking place. We could have settled for the workmanship happening there but that was not enough, so I decided to incorporate two cherry spline joints in the building. Wouldn’t you know, on that piece of land there was a perfect cherry tree to use for these 3' x 8' splines,” said Nicholas. In July of 2011, with contributions from numerous family members, the framing of the barn was completed. A barn raising party was held and close to a hundred friends and family came to enjoy the feat. In the next few months, the 3,960-square-foot structure could be called complete. On August 25, 2012, a plaque to commemorate the 100th anniversary of their Grandfather’s birth was mounted to the red pine he had planted and the building was dedicated to him. “The tree was perfect, as if Grandpa had cut it for us and laid it there at our feet for us to find and use for this magnificent project,” said Nicholas. “Thanks to all who helped make my dreams a reality! I couldn’t have done it without ALL of your support and family ‘spirit’.”

Tyler Verdery - Timber Frame Pavilion
octagonal post and beam timber frame pavilion
octagonal post and beam timber frame pavilion
octagonal post and beam timber frame pavilion
 
Tyler Verdery

Tyler Verdery cutting a mortise

Working in the family business at the wood yards at age 14, Tyler Verdery is no stranger to working with wood. With his Wood-Mizer LT40 portable sawmill along with southern yellow pine and eastern red cedar logs ready to saw, he knew he had to finally get started on his own timber frame project.Tyler and his sons were able to mill 100% of the 2,700 board feet on their LT40 sawmill and used all mortise and tenon joints with wooden pegs and no nails in the octagonal post and beam
timber frame structure. When the 32 foot diameter, 900-square foot pavilion was finished, Tyler and his family were all able admire the beauty of the wood, joinery, and artistry of the patterns. “Our family will enjoy this timber frame pavilion for generations,” he said.


Mark Garner - Log Cabin from Salvaged Trees
dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama
interior of dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama
interior of dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama
framing of dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama
 
dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama built from salvaged lumber
 salvaged lumber ready to be milled
father and son look down mill
interior of dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama

 

When a tornado tragically struck the Talladega National Forest in 2013 leaving a path of fallen pines in its wake, Mark Garner jumped at the opportunity to repurpose these trees into something beautiful. The pines, a part of the Pinhoti Trail on Cheaha Mountain, were up for bid and as the highest bidder, Mark Garner was able to take the trees home. “We had the lake lot already but the opportunity to save these trees and turn them into a cabin was the inspiration to get us to start building,” Mark said. Using his Wood-Mizer LT40HD portable sawmill, Mark began building his dream cabin on Lake Wedowee in Randolph County, Alabama. With the help of family, this 1,764-square-foot log cabin was completed in just 18 months. Using the Wood-Mizer sawmill to cut 75% of the salvaged wood, Mark saved around $37,000 on the overall project. For construction, the tongue and groove method was applied to a majority of the wood throughout the cabin, as well as stick framing. Mark says everyone loves the completed project and are amazed they turned logs into a cabin. “My Wood-
Mizer is a hobby for me that I never would have thought would produce a cabin or the memories it has with family,” said Mark. “I bought it to make lumber for the woodworking I enjoy but never imagined being able to do this with it. We enjoyed salvaging and sawing the logs as much as we enjoy the cabin.”

Loren Snavely - Trophy Cabinets

 

 

custom trophy cabinets built with a LT40HD Sawmill
students constructing custom trophy cabinets
students constructing custom trophy cabinets
students constructing custom trophy cabinets
 
students constructing custom trophy cabinets
custom trophy cabinets built with a LT40HD Sawmill
Wood-Mizer LT40HD portable sawmill

Looking for a way to show their appreciation to teachers and staff at Mount Academy High School, seniors from the graduating class of 2015 decided to make trophy cabinets as a departing gift. Inspired by their enthusiasm, Loren Snavely sawed 120 board feet of red oak on his Wood-Mizer LT40HD portable sawmill equipped with RazorTip bandsaw blades and donated the lumber for the project. Using glued up panels and dovetail joints, the students created two beautiful trophy cabinets that measured 4 feet wide, 6 feet high, and 2 feet deep in just three months. Loren says this was a very worthwhile hands-on project for the students to accomplish. The cabinets will provide plenty of room for past and future trophies and awards, but the students involved in the cabinet project will always have their teamwork and achievement proudly displayed at the school. The staff of the high school was completely blown away by the surprise cabinets, which will be cherished for many years by the entire staff and student body. Loren says, “There is something about a project like this seeing it [created] from Wood- Mizer sawmill to finished cabinet that goes way beyond the project. These kids will never forget the sense of accomplishment, teamwork and fulfillment they got out of doing this for their entire school. These cabinets will be there for years to come.”

Steven Brown - Grape Press

After seeing an antique grape press, Steven Brown thought it would be cool to make one that was fully functional as a fathers day gift for his dad. Using his Wood-Mizer LT28 portable sawmill, Steven sawed 100% of the oak needed for the press. "There are hand carved grape leaves and vines on the table top. The drain spout is sloped to allow the juice to drain into the juice bucket with a waffle pattern on the bottom of the press for better juicing." Steven said the portability of his LT28 was very helpful during the project. "I am extremely happy with the way it turned out."

 

grape press built with wood-mizer sawmill
basin of grape press
top of replica grape press
bottom details of replica grape press
 
replica of antique grape press
replica of antique grape press
interior of replica of antique grape press
replica of antique grape press


Bob Brothen - Norway Inspired Barn

When traveling abroad, Bob Brothen was inspired to bring something back. “On a visit to my grandfather’s home in Norway I saw buildings constructed by my great grandfather in the 1880’s. The ability to saw lumber to build in that style inspired us to plan a building that would emulate his work.” With the use of his Wood-Mizer LT10 personal sawmill, and some help from his brother and son, Bob created his 924 square foot barn over the course of one fall and two summers. Bob was sure to stay true to his inspired design. “We used a type of timber frame construction, board and batten siding, extended floor joists, dormers, and wide board flooring similar to what my great grandfather might have done. The trim and color is old Norway inspired. I felt that we produced something that will last not only because of the solid wood construction but because its unique character will be worth preserving,” said Bob. “In a world where so much is manufactured and mass produced, a unique building using unique materials always seems to generate interest.” For this project, Bob, his son, and his brother, were able to cut 6,000 board feet of pine and poplar in a little over 60 hours, spread over five weekends. “When we purchased the LT10 sawmill, we planned to saw only specialty lumber for small projects. We soon learned that our Wood-Mizer has the capability to go well beyond our initial expectations.”

 

custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill
Wood-Mizer LT10 personal sawmill and lumber
interior of custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill
custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill
 
ramp into custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill
framing of custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill
framing of custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill
Bob Brotthen and his custom 924 square foot barn built with LT10 sawmill

Jesse Cover - LT50 Hydraulic Sawmill

LT50 sawmill owner, Jesse Cover, has worked on business exteriors, steam locomotive restoration, and the construction of a small railroad track at the Cover Apple Ranch.

 

small railroad track at the Cover Apple Ranch
steam locomotive
custom bench at Cover Apple Ranch.
Jesse Cover and his family with his sawmill

Fred Beal - Rustic Cabin
rustic cabin in Montana built with materials sawed o Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
rustic cabin in Montana built with materials sawed o Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
interior of rustic cabin in Montana built with materials sawed o Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
 
rustic cabin in Montana built with materials sawed o Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
window frame and door made with materials from Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
custom shingles made by Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill
rustic cabin in Montana built with materials sawed o Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill

Fred Beal built this rustic cabin on his property in Montana with materials sawed on his Wood-Mizer LT15 Portable Sawmill. "Almost all of the wood is beetle killed lodge pole pine," said Fred. "I cut the cabin logs to be 7 inches thick. For the log height, I did not want the logs to be all uniform so I varied the saw height as I advanced the saw through the log to make the log height variable. I used a log dovetail jig to cut the notches and sawed joists, logs, rafters, and roof decking all with the LT15." Fred completed the cabin in just one year and said he feels a "great sense of accomplishment." 


John Hubbard - Family Cabin
rustic log cabin in Kentucky
interior of rustic log cabin in Kentucky
interior of rustic log cabin in Kentucky
rustic log cabin in Kentucky
 
flooring inside rustic log cabin in Kentucky
custom door inside rustic log cabin in Kentucky
bathroom inside rustic log cabin in Kentucky
John Hubbard and his son with their Wood-Mizer Sawmill

Kentucky farmer, pastor, and carpenter, John Hubbard had always wanted a place for family and friends to seek refuge from the everyday business of life, free of charge. When southern pine beetles destroyed pine trees on his property, John saw a perfect opportunity to salvage these dead and dying trees to make his dream a reality. “I didn’t want this wood to go to waste,” John said. Read More >>

Robert Hughes - Picture Frame
custom frame constructed from salvage lumber
damaged tree on Wood-Mizer sawmill
cross cut of salvaged lumber
Wood-Mizer sawmill and salvaged tree
 
Wood-Mizer sawmill and salvaged tree
Wood-Mizer sawmill and salvaged tree
Wood-Mizer sawmill and salvaged tree
Wood-Mizer sawmill and salvaged tree

In 2012, Florida landmark and fifth oldest tree in the world, “The Senator,” was destroyed in an arson fire. Artisans like Robert Hughes of Geneva, Florida sprang into action to preserve history. “I contacted Seminole County authorities after the fire and helped them realize something should be done to preserve the history of the historic old tree,” Robert recalls. “With the help of friends and other artisans we were able to put together a historic tree rescue project; a three year endeavor of love and dedication to woodworking and the preservation of the Senator Tree.” Robert’s Wood-Mizer LT40 Hydraulic portable sawmill played a vital part in the preservation project, especially, he says, because with thin kerf milling more of the old and valuable wood could be turned into lumber rather than sawdust. In addition to a large picture frame, museum table, and guitar, the projects created with the salvaged wood are ongoing. For their efforts in saving the remnants of one of earth’s largest Cypress trees for future generations, Robert and a number of fellow artisans were honored in June by Florida’s Seminole County Commissioners. “For me, the Senator Tree Restoration has been the greatest honor and challenge I have ever had,” Robert says. “I am both a woodworker and a sawyer. Both skills were necessary to complete this project. I feel like many more generations will be able to appreciate the artwork from the Senator Tree because I was able to bring the two skills together.” See more projects from Robert Hughes>>

Robert Hughes - Museum Bench
custom mortise and tenon bench
transporting salvaged lumber to Wood-Mizer sawmill
slab of wood on Wood-Mizer sawmill
slab of wood on Wood-Mizer sawmill
 
closeup of hand-cut mortise and teno
custom mortise and tenon bench
custom mortise and tenon bench
custom mortise and tenon bench

This museum bench was crafted from 3,500 year-old salvaged wood by woodworker and artisan Robert Hughes. See more projects from The Senator Tree and read Robert's story>>


Stan Dixon - Wheels of Friendship
 Stan Dixon and the Wheels of Friendship
 Stan Dixon and the Wheels of Friendship
disabled persons working with milled lumber
disabled persons working with milled lumber
 
Frames built for wheels of friendship
LT15 sawmill
painting by disabled person

By using his Wood-Mizer LT15 portable sawmill, Stan Dixon helps students with disabilities create their own original art. “The Wheels of Friendship project is working with students with disabilities to create paintings using the wheels of their wheelchair as a paintbrush,” said Stan. “The project allows all students to be included in the project regardless of their disability.” After milling 850 board feet of salvaged white pine, spruce, and red oak logs from Hurricane Sandy for the project, Stan donated the lumber to the Wheels of Friendship project. Students from Bethlehem Area Vocational-Technical School (BAVTS) and nonprofit organization Mikaylas Voice constructed twenty large picture frames and easels to display the original paintings along with benches, chairs and a SkillsUSA display using the donated lumber. The end results have been life changing. Three students from BAVTS each won a $10,000 scholarship to the Pennsylvania School of Technology through state and national SkillsUSA competitions. The paintings have also caught the attention of the local news station, several art exhibits, and are even on display at the Pennsylvania State Capital. Stan Dixon is very proud of his involvement with the ongoing program and says, “It is amazing to see the reaction on the student’s face when you deliver the final painting. The paintings are awesome and the kids’ reactions are priceless.”

For more information on this project, visit www.mikaylasvoice.org